The Call Of The Wild

With Forager And Chef Lori McCarthy   Posted March 5, 2019 You Can Eat The Woods For Dinner Lori McCarthy gets excited about food. Wild food, traditional food, the food that nourished our ancestors and our culture, the food that makes us who we are. “It's my belief that our foodways are stories to be shared” she says. “Embracing the past, holding strong in the present, and growing with the future, they shape who we are as a people.” Rooted in the land and sea from which our traditional foodstuffs spring, Lori's relationship with cultural foods and the land borders on the spiritual, her respect for the natural world reminiscent of an earlier time when understanding of nature's cycles meant life or death. A chef by trade, the birth of her children sparked a decision to follow her heart into the forest and down to the shore where the heart…

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Outport Chronicles: A Weekend in Grates Cove, NL

Photos by Sara Jenkins & John Jamieson This chilly winter weather has us thinking back on some of the fun we had before the snows hit.  This October, as a thank-you to our valued members who make all of our programming and educational activities possible, we organized a members-only weekend retreat to Grates Cove, NL.  We chose Grates Cove because its remoteness, rugged beauty, and the ingenuity of this community’s adaptation to both the natural landscape and changing lifeways of Newfoundland and Labrador inspire us to get out and celebrate both our province’s natural heritage and our role within it. Grates Cove is the northernmost community on the Avalon Peninsula, located at the tip of the Bay de Verde Peninsula and situated in the eastern hyper-oceanic barrens ecoregion.  This ecoregion is restricted to several isolate localities in Newfoundland and is characterized by extensive carpets of heath with diverse lichen, moss,…

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The Forget-me-nots of Newfoundland and Labrador

By Andus Voitk Posted March 26, 2018 A few years ago John Maunder sent around a note with references, suggesting that most likely Myosotis arvensis was the species of forget-me-not that flowered in Somme during WWI and, therefore, became the floral symbol of the Newfoundland Regiment (Hill 1917). That note piqued my interest in the genus. It took me a few years to find and identify all four of our species: M. arvensis, M. laxa, M. scorpioides and M. sylvatica. The photographs come from an attempt to master a small point and shoot camera; although of limited quality, most demonstrate the pertinent distinguishing features adequately (Figure 1). This short review is dedicated to John with thanks for his untiring efforts to enlighten us, and at the same written for my grandson, Eemil, with whom I have spent part of two summers looking at these small blue beauties. Of the four…

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Naturalist Sightings

By Justin So A red fox was observed bounding across sea ice to get at a colony of puffins in Elliston, NL (Photo by Rodolphe Devillers). Over the last few weeks there have been more than a few interesting nature sightings around our province.  Check out below some fascinating wildlife stories in the news and online. • Elliston, NL is one of the best places to view our provincial bird, the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica). A fox was filmed by Rodolphe Devillers trying to get a meal of puffin. The fox bounds across the sea ice and cliffs to find a way up, but is ultimately not successful at getting at the puffins. • In late May, Gerard Gale in Black Duck Siding in western Newfoundland, captured video of a white piebald moose (Alces alces) as close as three feet away. These moose are predominantly white in colour with spots of pigment…

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Bees, Agriculture and the Precautionary Principle

By Julie Sircom,  Grenfell Campus, Memorial University of Newfoundland It’s hard to miss the news that Newfoundland’s honey bees are special – Varroa mite, a major pest elsewhere, is absent from the island, and several other diseases have not been found here. Many of the stressors that have led to declines elsewhere aren’t a problem here. Far less is known about the island’s native bees. There are over 70 species, from tiny solitary bees not much larger than an ant to the familiar fuzzy bumble bees. These bees provide a vital and largely unmeasured service, pollinating both crops and native plants. There would be no berry-picking in the autumn if it weren’t for our many native pollinators. Little is known about the health of our native bees, either in terms of the stability of their populations or the types of diseases that affect them. [pullquote] There would be no berry-picking…

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